Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘bmj’ Category

Breaking News

I have now changed over to a new BLOG, if you want to keep up to date as a doctor and GP, just click here…….

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

click here for the abstract of the article

BMJ 2008;336:36-40 (5 January). Clinical review
by: Sarah A E Logan, specialist registrar, Eithne MacMahon, consultant Infection and Immunology:

  • Bacterial and viral meningitis cannot reliably be differentiated clinically, and all suspected cases should be referred to hospital
  • Viral meningitis is most common in young children; the incidence decreases with age
  • Enteroviruses are the most common cause at all ages
  • Although most cases are self limiting, morbidity may be considerable
  • Herpes simplex virus causes viral meningitis, which may recur
  • Genital herpes infection may be acquired from a partner after many years within a monogamous relationship
  • Meningitis is a feature of HIV seroconversion
  • In the absence of associated encephalitis, the prognosis is usually good

Read Full Post »

BMJ 2008;336:2-3 (5 January).
Proton pump inhibitors have been a tremendous therapeutic advance and have transformed the lives of patients with previously intractable symptoms, say editorialists Ian Forgacs and Aathavan Loganayagam. But the drugs are being overused, and side effects – although rare – should not be overlooked.

Rapid Response by Dr Raymond C Seidler, GP, NSW, Australia:

  • “Perhaps it would be salutary to consider how rare it is now to see patients with perforated ulcers or even serious gastric or duodenal ulceration.
  • These were commonplace in my early days of general practice 25 years ago. The proton pump inhibitors as a class are effective.”

Read Full Post »

monkey-gun.jpg

BMJ  2007;335:470-471 (8 September):

News

Proliferation of firearms is growing global health problem

John Zarocostas

The growing number of civilians holding firearms is fuelling gun crime worldwide and is putting healthcare systems, especially in poor countries, under stress, an expert report says. Gun crime kills about 250 000 people a year and injures many more.

Read Full Post »

BMJ  2007;335:786 (20 October).

Two papers have recently been published on bmj.com on the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee.

Acupuncture has no additional benefit in people taking a course of exercise.

Read Full Post »

Research, BMJ, doi:10.1136/bmj.39367.495995.AE (published 6 November 2007)
 

What is already known on this topic

  • Increased body mass index is known to increase the risk of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus, endometrial cancer, kidney cancer, and postmenopausal breast cancer in women
  • Body mass index has also been associated with the risk of other, rarer, cancers, but the findings are not yet conclusive

What this study adds

  • High body mass index in women may increase the risk of multiple myeloma, leukaemia, pancreatic cancer, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and ovarian cancer
  • Menopausal status seems to affect the relation between body mass index and risk of breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and colorectal cancer
  • Among postmenopausal women in the UK, 5% of all cancers (about 6000 annually) are attributable to women being overweight or obese
  • Around half of all cases of endometrial cancer and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus in postmenopausal UK women are attributable to women being overweight or obese

Read Full Post »

Clinical Review, BMJ  2007;335:929-932 (3 November).

Summary points

  • A favourable outcome depends on early, aggressive, treatment
  • Antimicrobial treatment must take into account both patient susceptibilities and local resistance patterns; advice from infectious disease or microbiology colleagues is often helpful
  • Volume resuscitation and cardiovascular support should be titrated to simple clinical end points
  • Subtle signs of organ hypoperfusion should be sought in physically robust patients
  • The role of activated protein C and low dose steroids remains to be clarified

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »